What is a Working with Children Check?

What is a Working with Children Check?

By Babysits, 4 min read

Having a Working with Children Check will not only help you get a babysitting job, but it also gives parents peace of mind when they know that their children are in safe hands.

What is a Working with Children Check?

A Working with Children Check (WWCC) is a screening process which assesses people who work with children. A WWCC will assess a person’s criminal history to determine whether they have a relevant charge or conviction which could indicate potential danger to children.

In most cases, a Working with Children Check is only required by law when you are working for a babysitting agency, childcare centre or employed in other child-related work. However, we recommend that you do obtain a Working with Children Check to not only increase your chances of finding babysitting jobs, but also to ensure the safety of the Babysits community.

How Do I Get a Working with Children Check?

Please note that the Working with Children Check differs per state. For example, in Queensland the equivalent of the WWCC is a Blue Card, in the Northern Territory the equivalent can be considered the Ochre Card, and in Tasmania and the ACT it is the Working with Vulnerable People check. For more information specific to your state, please see below:

Victoria
The Working with Children Check Victoria assists in the protection of children from sexual and/or physical harm by ensuring that people who work with, or care for, children are subject to a thorough screening process. If you live in Victoria, you can apply for a Working with Children Check by visiting Working with Children Check Victoria

New South Wales
The Working with Children Check NSW involves a National Police Check (criminal history record check) and a review of reportable workplace misconduct. If cleared, your WWCC will be valid for 5 years (with continuous monitoring). For more information, visit Service NSW

Western Australia
To apply for the Working with Children Check WA, you must first obtain an application form from an authorised Australia Post outlet, or you can contact the WWC Screening Unit. In WA, each application form has a unique identifier and therefore application forms cannot be downloaded online. For more information, please visit Working with Children Check WA

South Australia
From 1 July 2019, the previous Child-Related Employment Check has been replaced with the Working with Children Check in South Australia. If you already have a Child-Related Employment Check, this will remain valid until its expiration date. Once expired, you will need to apply for a Working with Children Check. For more information, please visit the DHS Screening Unit

Tasmania
In Tasmania, the Working with Vulnerable People check is similar to the WWCC in that it involves an assessment of your criminal history to ensure that you are safe to work with vulnerable people (including children). For information and to apply, please visit the relevant Consumer, Building and Occupational Services webpage

Queensland
In Queensland, a Blue Card is the equivalent of a Working with Children’s Check. The Blue Card system is made up of 3 parts: screening, ongoing monitoring and risk management strategies. For more information on the Blue Card application process, please visit the Queensland Government website

Northern Territory
In the Northern Territory, the Working with Children’s Clearance (otherwise known as the Ochre Card) is an assessment to determine whether or not you may pose a risk to children. The assessment will assess your police history, employment records, character references and possibly reports about your recent behaviour. You can apply online, in-person or by post. For more information, please visit Working with Children Clearance NT

ACT
In the ACT, the Working with Vulnerable People Act ensures that those who work or volunteer with vulnerable people undergo a background check and are registered. According to the WWVP Act, a person is considered vulnerable if they are a child under the age of 18 years or an adult who is experiencing disadvantage. For more information and to apply, head to the Working with vulnerable people (WWVP) registration webpage


For more information and to help you become an even better babysitter, check out our other Tips for Babysitters. Would you like more information on the measures we take to keep our platform safe? Take a look at our Trust & Safety page.